Global analysis finds early onset colorectal cancer rising in many high-income countries

A new American Cancer Society study finds that colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence is increasing exclusively in young adults in nine high-income countries spanning three continents. The study, appearing in the journal Gut, finds the rising rates are in contrast to stable or declining trends in older adults, suggesting that changes Continue Reading

Blue Brain finds how neurons in the mouse neocortex form billions of synaptic connections

Researchers at EPFL’s Blue Brain Project, a Swiss brain research Initiative, have combined two high profile, large-scale datasets to produce something completely new—a first draft model of the rules guiding neuron-to-neuron connectivity of a whole mouse neocortex. They generated statistical instances of the micro-connectome of 10 million neurons, a model Continue Reading

Study finds many psychiatric disorders have heightened impulsivity

Individuals with many different psychiatric disorders have a higher tendency to choose smaller, immediate rewards over larger, delayed rewards, a study led by Hamilton researchers has found. The findings of a meta-analysis by researchers of McMaster University and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, which combined data from more than 40 studies, Continue Reading

Study finds cellular processes controlling the formation of lymphatic valves

Lymphedema, resulting from a damaged lymphatic system, can be a debilitating disease in which excess protein-rich fluid (lymph) collects in soft tissues and causes swelling鈥攎ost often in the arms or legs. Symptom severity varies, but the chronic swelling can lead to pain, thickened skin, disfigurement, loss of mobility in affected Continue Reading

Brain finds order amidst chaos

How does the brain find order amidst a sea of noise and chaos? Researchers at the EPFL Blue Brain Project have found the answer by using advanced simulation techniques to investigate the way neurons talk to each other. In a paper published in Nature Communications, they found that by working Continue Reading

Study finds alternative to ‘revolving door’ of opioid detox and relapse

In a first-ever randomized trial, patients at a short-term inpatient program began long-term outpatient treatment with buprenorphine before discharge, with better outcomes than detox patients. Three out of four people who complete an inpatient opioid withdrawal management program—commonly known as “detox”—relapse within a month, leading to a “revolving door” effect. Continue Reading

Study finds toolkit could improve detection and management of iron deficiency in pregnancy

Iron deficiency in pregnancy is a common problem that often goes unrecognized and untreated due to a lack of knowledge of its implications and competing clinical priorities. To enhance screening and management of iron deficiency in pregnancy, a research team at Toronto’s St. Michael’s Hospital developed a quality improvement toolkit, Continue Reading

Testosterone has a complicated relationship with moral reasoning, study finds

Although some studies have linked high levels of testosterone to immoral behavior, a new study published in Nature Human Behaviour finds testosterone supplements actually made people more sensitive to moral norms, suggesting that testosterone’s influence on behavior is more complicated than previously thought. Researchers at The University of Texas at Continue Reading

Testosterone has a complicated relationship with moral reasoning, study finds

Although some studies have linked high levels of testosterone to immoral behavior, a new study published in Nature Human Behaviour finds testosterone supplements actually made people more sensitive to moral norms, suggesting that testosterone’s influence on behavior is more complicated than previously thought. Researchers at The University of Texas at Continue Reading

Study finds racial disparities in pregnancy rates for kidney transplant recipients

Among women who are kidney transplant recipients, Hispanic women have a higher likelihood of pregnancy than white women, according to new research from the University of Cincinnati (UC). The study, published in the PLOS ONE journal, demonstrates the importance of understanding the factors responsible for these disparities in pregnancy rates. Continue Reading