Who you see matters: Stroke patients benefit more from observing their own hand movements during therapy

Japanese scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have found that for stroke patients, observing their own hand movements in a video-assisted therapy—as opposed to someone else’s hand—could enhance brain activity and speed up rehabilitation. Their findings were first made available online in May and published in the Continue Reading

Odds of developing C. diff increased in older cancer patients

(HealthDay)—Older adults with cancer have increased odds of developing Clostridiodes difficile infection (CDI), according to a study published in the September issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases, a publication of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mini Kamboj, M.D., from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York Continue Reading

Dementia care program improves mental health of patients, caregivers

UCLA-led research finds that a comprehensive dementia care program staffed by nurse practitioners working within a health system improves the mental and emotional health of patients and their caregivers. While the program did not slow the progression of dementia, it did reduce patients’ behavioral problems and depression, and lower the Continue Reading

Exercise associated with benefit to patients with advanced colorectal cancer

Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who engaged in moderate exercise while undergoing chemotherapy tended to have delayed progression of their disease and fewer severe side effects from treatment, according to the results of a new study. Even low-intensity exercise, such as walking four or more hours a week, was associated Continue Reading

Enterovirus antibodies detected in acute flaccid myelitis patients

A new study analyzing samples from patients with and without acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) provides additional evidence for an association between the rare but often serious condition that causes muscle weakness and paralysis, and infection with non-polio enteroviruses. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the Continue Reading

Brain stimulation for PTSD patients

For 8-million adults who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder in any given year, medication and cognitive therapy have been the treatment protocol. Now, University of Houston assistant professor of electrical engineering Rose T. Faghih is reporting in Frontiers in Neuroscience that a closed-loop brain stimulator, based on sweat response, can Continue Reading