A liquid biopsy test can identify patients who may respond to immune checkpoint blockade

A new liquid biopsy test could detect microsatellite instability (MSI) and tumor mutational burden (TMB), indicating that it could help determine which patients are likely to respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors, according to results published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. In May Continue Reading

Study of newly homeless ED patients finds multiple contributors to homelessness

A qualitative study of recently homeless emergency department (ED) patients found multiple contributors to homelessness that can inform future homelessness prevention interventions. The study findings are published in the September 2019 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM). The lead author of Continue Reading

Black, Hispanic patients more likely to be brought to safety-net hospital emergency rooms

A new national study done by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center showed large differences in the emergency department (ED) and hospital destinations of minority (Black and Hispanic) patients who are transported by emergency medical services (EMS) when compared with their non-Hispanic white counterparts. Continue Reading

Novel approach leads to potential sepsis prevention in burn patients

Immediately following severe burns, bacteria reach the wound from different sources, including the patient’s skin, gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tracts and health care-related human contact. Within the wound, bacteria multiply, establish an infection and move from the infected burn wound into the bloodstream, causing serious complications like sepsis, multiple-organ failure and Continue Reading

Videos, music on tablets boost moods of dementia patients and caregivers

Dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, often afflicts patients with negative moods: confusion, anger, sadness or apathy. Negative emotions also affect caregivers, who are often family members with little formal training to cope with the stress of caring for a loved one. Patients with dementia may be prescribed antidepressants or other drugs Continue Reading

New testosterone nasal spray offers patients an alternative

A newly patented, testosterone-containing nasal spray developed by a psychology professor at The University of Texas at Austin could provide those suffering from testosterone deficiency and other ailments, such as anxiety disorders, with easily modulated, fast-acting results. Currently, those diagnosed with “low T”—testosterone deficiency or hypogonadism—may receive hormone supplements via Continue Reading

Exercise physiologists aid early mobilization in ICU patients

(HealthDay)—Exercise physiologists can provide safe and effective early mobilization in intensive care units (ICUs), according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Critical Care. Claudia DiSabatino Smith, Ph.D., R.N., from University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and colleagues used the 12-point Activity Continue Reading

Screening for genetic high cholesterol could help patients and families avoid heart attack

Genetic high cholesterol is underdiagnosed and undertreated, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. Screening could identify patients and family members affected by the condition so that lifestyle changes and treatments can be started to prevent heart attack and stroke. Heterozygous Continue Reading

For patients with diabetes, ticagrelor reduced heart attacks, strokes

In late-breaking clinical trial results presented in a Hot Line Session today at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2019, investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Greater Paris University Hospitals—AP-HP/Université de Paris presented the results from The Effect of Ticagrelor on Health Outcomes in Diabetes Mellitus Patients Intervention Study Continue Reading

Motivational text messages help patients with diabetes

A low-cost text-messaging programme improves blood sugar control in patients with diabetes and coronary heart disease. That’s the finding of the CHAT-DM randomised trial reported today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology and published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. Study author Dr. Xiqian Huo Continue Reading

Patients comfortable with postoperative telehealth visits

(HealthDay)—Despite initial hesitancy, plastic surgery patients are satisfied with postoperative telehealth visits, according to a study published in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Christopher D. Funderburk, M.D., from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Hanover, New Hampshire, and colleagues developed a workflow for postoperative patients in the telehealth setting Continue Reading