Genetically manipulating protein level in colon cancer cells can improve chemotherapy

Colorectal cancer outcomes may improve by genetically altering an immune-regulatory protein in cancer cells, making the cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy. That’s according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings, published this month in Oncogene, indicate that increasing the expression of the PD-L1 protein in colorectal cancer cells can improve Continue Reading

Rapamycin may reduce accumulation of a toxic β-thalassemia protein

Rapamycin, a drug widely used to protect organ transplant patients, eased symptoms of β-thalassemia in mice and showed promise for treatment of humans with the inherited disorder, researchers reported. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital investigators led the study, which appears online today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Researchers showed Continue Reading

Protein aggregation: Protein assemblies relevant not only for neurodegenerative disease

Amyloid fibrils play a crucial role in neurodegenerative illnesses. Scientists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Forschungszentrum Jülich have now been able to use cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to decode the spatial structure of the fibrils that are formed from PI3K SH3 domains—an important model system for research. Although the Continue Reading

Researchers identify protein governing platinum resistant ovarian cancer

The extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) protein is an important mechanism behind platinum-resistance in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, according to a study from a research team at the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center. The study, which is the first to provide clinical evidence confirming a link between ERK and hypoxia-inducible factor Continue Reading

Researchers first to map structure of protein aggregate that leads to Alzheimer’s

A research team including faculty at Binghamton University and University of Colorado Denver are the first to map the molecular structure of an aggressive protein aggregate that causes acceleration of Alzheimer’s disease. “Approximately 10 percent of Alzheimer’s cases result from familial mutations,” said Wei Qiang, assistant professor of biophysical chemistry Continue Reading

Super-resolution microscopy sheds light on how dementia protein becomes dysfunctional

University of Queensland researchers have used super-resolution microscopy to observe key molecules at work inside living brain cells, further unravelling the puzzle of memory formation and the elusive causes of dementia. UQ Queensland Brain Institute’s Clem Jones Centre for Ageing and Dementia Research Professors Frédéric Meunier and Jürgen Götz found Continue Reading

DNA-protective protein could help clinicians better target fast-growing cancer cells

The discovery that an essential protein plays a protective role during cell division, could open the door to better targeted treatment of fast-growing cancer cells. Polo-like kinase (PLK1) was previously thought to have a major function—helping chromosome alignment during mitosis for cell division. But scientists at the Genome Damage and Continue Reading

Alzheimer’s protein is likely held together with many weak chemical interactions

The chemical interactions that give proteins their shape may be weaker and more numerous than previously recognized. These weak connections provide a new way for researchers to understand proteins that cause disease and help them gain insights into the fundamentals of chemistry. Chemists at the University of Tokyo modeled the Continue Reading

Researchers map protein-gene interactions involved in Alzheimer’s disease

Among the confounding challenges of diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the fact that patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic versions of the degenerative condition may share similar neuropathological burdens but experience significantly different rates of cognitive decline. In a new study, published July 23, 2019 in Cell Reports, a Continue Reading