Scientists discover a direct link from the brain’s emotion circuit to the movement circuit

During high stress situations such as making a goal in soccer, some athletes experience a rapid decline in performance under pressure, known as “choking.” Now, Salk Institute researchers have uncovered what might be behind the phenomenon: one-way signals from the brain’s emotion circuit to the movement circuit. The study, which Continue Reading

Link between gut microbes and muscle growth suggests future approach to tackle muscle loss

The microorganisms living in the intestines could help with muscle growth and function, opening new doors to interventions for age-related skeletal muscle loss, an international research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found. Through a series of strength and movement-related exercises conducted on mice, the team Continue Reading

Scientists establish link between prenatal HIV exposure and decreased infant immunity

In the August 16 edition of Nature Scientific Reports, scientists at the University of Rhode Island provide concrete evidence linking the specific immune responses in HIV-negative babies to the HIV-positive status of their mothers. The work was carried out in the laboratory of Barbara Lohman-Payne, associate research professor with URI’s Continue Reading

Scientists link ‘hunger hormone’ to memory in Alzheimer’s study

Scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas have found evidence suggesting that resistance to the “hunger hormone” ghrelin in the brain is linked to the cognitive impairments and memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The findings, based on observations of postmortem brain-tissue samples from Alzheimer’s patients and on Continue Reading

New analyses demonstrate link between different forms of menopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer incidence

An international collaboration, using data from more than 100,000 women with breast cancer from 58 epidemiological studies worldwide, has found that using MHT is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, and that some increased risk persists for more than a decade after use stops. The findings, published in Continue Reading

Study identifies possible genetic link between children’s language and mental health

A new study suggests there may be genetic explanations for why some children with poor language also have poor mental health. The University of York-led study examined genetic variants in six genes that are thought to contribute to language development in children. The researchers used Polygenic scoring, a statistical technique Continue Reading